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While it can be easy to get caught up in planning activities and coordinating schedules, it’s significant to remember why families are important. “The Family: A Proclamation to the World” states, “The divine plan of happiness enables family relationships to be perpetuated beyond the grave.” Thus, strengthening those relationships helps us prepare for eternal life. Check out this great family home evening lesson on Family Time! Scripture: Mosiah 4:15 Hymn: Love At Home Lesson: T-I-M-E Spells Love Treat: Crescent Pepperoni Rollups or Buffalo Chicken Bites Activity: Plan, or have a surprise family outing! View entire lesson...

Family Time

FHE Scripture

Scripture

Mosiah 4:15

“15 But ye will teach [your children] to walk in the ways of truth and soberness; ye will teach them to love one another, and to serve one another.”

 

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

Love At Home  Hymn #294

1. There is beauty all around
When there’s love at home;
There is joy in ev’ry sound
When there’s love at home.
Peace and plenty here abide,
Smiling sweet on ev’ry side.
Time doth softly, sweetly glide
When there’s love at home.
Love at home, love at home;
Time doth softly, sweetly glide
When there’s love at home.

2. In the cottage there is joy
When there’s love at home;
Hate and envy ne’er annoy
When there’s love at home.
Roses bloom beneath our feet;
All the earth’s a garden sweet,
Making life a bliss complete
When there’s love at home.
Love at home, love at home;
Making life a bliss complete
When there’s love at home.

3. Kindly heaven smiles above
When there’s love at home;
All the world is filled with love
When there’s love at home.
Sweeter sings the brooklet by;
Brighter beams the azure sky.
Oh, there’s One who smiles on high
When there’s love at home.
Love at home, love at home;
Oh, there’s One who smiles on high
When there’s love at home.

 

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For Children* 

Read or summarize the stories in “Family Time”  by Isaac V. and Sarah Hart and talk about the importance of spending time together as a family.

Our family chooses to not watch TV on Sunday to help us keep the Sabbath day holy. One Sunday night, our neighbors told me about a show that I wanted to watch very badly. I asked my mom and dad if I could watch it, but they said no. I felt sad that I couldn’t watch the show. My mom read the Friend with me, and then we played a game together. My brother and sister joined us, and we all played a game together. It was fun! When I went to bed, I realized that I didn’t feel bad anymore for missing the TV show. I felt really good that I had kept the Sabbath day holy. – Isaac

My family has helped me stay close to the gospel because we read the scriptures each morning and have family prayer every morning and night. We also have a calendar so we know what each other is doing for the week, and we try to plan activities that the family can do together. Our family has overcome challenges by praying together and sometimes having a family fast. – Sarah

 

*For The Whole Family* 

Read and summarize “T-I-M-E Spells Love”  By Breanna Olaveston. Talk about the importance of spending time with family. 

Families are as diverse as individuals. The activities they do together vary, but one thing is true for all of them: as President Dieter F. Uchtdorfsaid, “In family relationships love is really spelled t-i-m-e, time.”1Whether family members get together for scheduled outings, sharing interests, or serving others, these gatherings strengthen relationships that can be eternal. The families below share what they’ve learned about making time together a priority.

Individual Attention

Leyla Williams of Virginia, USA, understands that children need one-on-one interaction just as much as adults, so she and her husband make it a priority to schedule time with them.

“My husband and I came up with our ‘Mommy and Me’ or ‘Daddy and Me’ dates with our five children,” Leyla says. “We would take them out—one at a time—for an evening or afternoon together. Sometimes it was dinner, sometimes bowling, sometimes just an ice cream cone or playing at the playground. But it was always a chance to stay close to them as they grew and to keep lines of communication open.

“As our children got older, the conversations we had on these ‘dates’ would turn to problems they were having with school, friends, siblings, and—yes—even their parents! Sometimes the conversations went deeper into struggles with certain commandments or their testimonies. Because we started when they were young, our teenage children were more comfortable broaching subjects that others their age might have found very difficult to discuss with a parent.

“Now that our older children are blazing through their teenage years, and all the activities that entails, we use it as a time to reconnect and reestablish those close relationships. Our kids look forward to it and like to plan their own activities. And with everyone headed in all different directions, I can look forward to those golden moments of having my children’s undivided attention for at least an hour or so.”

“When I’m Home, I’m Home”

Joe Staples of Utah, USA, sometimes found it challenging to keep an appropriate balance between his profession and his home life.

“Like many people, I had a natural tendency to want to excel, to do well, to get the next promotion—all worthy goals,” he says. “However, too often that ambition can come at the expense of family time.”

So, Joe set a rule that has helped him keep things in perspective and give his family the attention they need.

“Early in my career I set a personal rule that has helped me tremendously. In a nutshell, it has been, ‘When I’m home, I’m home.’ For me that meant not coming home from work simply to do more work. Not checking e-mail on the weekend. Not taking business calls at my home. I try to make a clear distinction between my work life and my time with family. This approach didn’t detract from my ambitions at work, and there were occasional exceptions, but in general this simple rule created an environment where I could be an engaged and involved father during my all-important time at home.”

Redefining “Date Night”

Bob and Suellen Weiler of Georgia, USA, have learned through many years of marriage that while some things are nonnegotiable, that doesn’t mean “family time” can’t be redefined. When it comes to date night, they know that the activity isn’t the most important part.

“As a couple, we have had to redefine ‘date night’ many times over the years,” Suellen says. “Now and then we actually do the dinner-and-a-movie thing, but many times we count running errands together, an emergency visit to one of the families he home teaches, or going to the hospital to give a blessing as our date. Our experience is that a chat over ice cream can make any outing a ‘date’!”

Sharing Interests

Making family a priority can be a challenge at any phase of life, but once children are grown and grandchildren live far away, it can be particularly difficult to spend time with family members. One grandmother was determined to spend time with her grandchildren, even though it was difficult.

“Refusing to be robbed of the ties and strength that come from my bright grandchildren, I decided to fight back. Grandmas can do that, you know,” says Joan Bone of Utah.

Joan decided to set aside a day to spend time with her grandchildren who lived nearby, but she had difficulty deciding what they should do together. She considered the activities her grandchildren liked, but Joan wanted to do something they could all enjoy—grandma and grandchildren alike.

“A wonderful inspiration came to me,” she says. “It was, ‘Share with them what you like, what you do. They get plenty of the activities that they do.’

“As we piled out of the car and gathered into my kitchen on the appointed day, the earthy aroma of wheat and yeast greeted us. The table was ready. The dough was prepared, and the boys’ eyes grew wide as I released it onto the table. My grandsons each took a portion and pushed, pulled, smacked, and rolled it. They smelled the dough and rubbed it against their cheeks. We laughed and talked and kneaded. We each formed a loaf and set it aside to rise again (if the yeast survived the intense workout the boys gave it) while we ate fried scones made from the extra dough. With honey dripping through our fingers, we enjoyed each other’s company and love.”

A Family Calling

The Ashby family from Utah has learned that serving in Church callings doesn’t need to distract from family time. They often find ways to help their father fulfill his Church calling while still spending time together as a family.

“When my husband was set apart as bishop, we decided that our young family would seek out opportunities to combine family time and his calling whenever possible,” Lisa Ashby said. “We began ‘family visit nights,’ where we visit ward members to let them know we are thinking of them. We take homemade goodies to them on Sunday evenings or invite them over for dinner or family home evening.”

Together Forever

While it can be easy to get caught up in planning activities and coordinating schedules, it’s significant to remember why families are important. “The Family: A Proclamation to the World” states, “The divine plan of happiness enables family relationships to be perpetuated beyond the grave.” Thus, strengthening those relationships helps us prepare for eternal life.

We can teach our children these important principles by holding family prayer and family home evening, going to church, keeping the commandments, reading the scriptures together, and keeping the focus of all these activities on the temple.

No matter how busy we are, these efforts will make a difference. As Lisa Ashby explains, “Finding time within our callings or responsibilities to include the family brings great strength, deepens testimonies, softens hearts, and builds a strong foundation of faith and service.”

Talk about the importance of spending time with family. 

 

 

FHE Treat

Treat

Crescent Pepperoni Rollups or Buffalo Chicken Bites

Crescent Pepperoni Rollups

IngredientsPzRolls

  1. 1 can refrigerated crescent rolls
  2. 40 slices turkey pepperoni
  3. 4 pieces of mozzarella string cheese, cut in half
  4. garlic powder
  5. pizza sauce

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375
  2. Unroll crescent rolls and separate into 8 triangles.
  3. Place 5 slices of turkey pepperoni on each crescent roll.
  4. Top pepperoni with string cheese half and roll up.
  5. Sprinkle crescent rolls with garlic powder.
  6. Place rolls on baking sheet and bake for 12-15 minutes, or until golden brown.
  7. Serve with a side of warm pizza sauce.

(From PlainChicken)

 

Buffalo Chicken Bites

IngredientsBufChik

  1. 3 cups shredded cooked chicken
  2. 1/4 to 1/2 cup hot sauce (or more to your taste)
  3. 3 1/2 oz. cream cheese, softened
  4. 2 cups sharp or medium shredded cheddar cheese
  5. 1 tsp onion powder
  6. 1 cup all-purpose flour
  7. 4 eggs, lightly beaten
  8. 3 – 4 cups Corn Flakes cereal, crushed

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350˚F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, mix the chicken, cream cheese and hot sauce until combined. Stir in the cheddar cheese and onion powder.
  2. Using a small cookie or ice cream scoop, spoon out the chicken mixture and roll into about 1 1/2 inch balls. Place on a plate or separate baking sheet until ready to dip.
  3. In three separate bowls, set out the flour, eggs and Corn Flakes. Dip each chicken ball first into the flour, then the egg and ending with the Corn Flakes. Place on the prepared baking sheet and bake for 20 to 25 minutes. Serve warm with ranch or blue cheese dressing.
  4. **If freezing for later, place the dipped and uncooked chicken balls onto the parchment lined baking sheet and flash freeze for 15 to 20 minutes. Transfer to a freezer bag and store in the freezer until ready. To bake, place the frozen chicken balls back on a baking sheet and bake at 350˚F for 25 to 30 minutes, until crispy and golden brown.

(From PlainChicken)

 

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

  1. Plan Family Activities for the next couple of days.
  2. Go on a surprise outing! Take snacks to a park or Just go walk around a nice part of town.

Comments

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About Aleah Ingram

Aleah Ingram
Aleah is a graduate of Southern Virginia University, where she studied English, Creative Writing, and Dance. She now works full time as a social media manager, writer, and editor. Aleah served a mission in California and is addicted to organic milk, Lang Leav poetry, Gaynor Minden pointe shoes, and Bollywood movies.
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