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Each and everyone of us is deeply loved by our Heavenly Father and Savior. They would never want us to forget our worth, even when someone or something may cause us to believe that we are worthless. This lesson is a great reminder of our worth and to never forget it! Scripture: D&C 18:10 Hymn: My Heavenly Father Loves Me or I am a Child of God Lesson: "No matter where we go or what we do, our worth in the sight of God will never change" Treat: Triple-Deckers or Pineapple Coconut Sherbet Activity: H2-Ohhh! or Beach Bowling •View entire lesson...

The Worth of Souls

FHE Scripture

Scripture

D&C 18:10

10 Remember the worth of souls is great in the sight of God;

 

 

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

My Heavenly Father Loves Me – Primary Songbook #228 or I am a Child of God – Hymn #301

My Heavenly Father Loves Me

1. Whenever I hear the song of a bird
Or look at the blue, blue sky,
Whenever I feel the rain on my face
Or the wind as it rushes by,
Whenever I touch a velvet rose
Or walk by our lilac tree,
I’m glad that I live in this beautiful world
Heav’nly Father created for me.

2. He gave me my eyes that I might see
The color of butterfly wings.
He gave me my ears that I might hear
The magical sound of things.
He gave me my life, my mind, my heart:
I thank him rev’rently
For all his creations, of which I’m a part.
Yes, I know Heav’nly Father loves me.

I am a Child of God

1. I am a child of God,
And he has sent me here,
Has given me an earthly home
With parents kind and dear.

2. I am a child of God,
And so my needs are great;
Help me to understand his words
Before it grows too late.

3. I am a child of God.
Rich blessings are in store;
If I but learn to do his will,
I’ll live with him once more.

4. I am a child of God.
His promises are sure;
Celestial glory shall be mine
If I can but endure.

Chorus

Lead me, guide me, walk beside me,
Help me find the way.
Teach me all that I must do
To live with him someday.

Optional descant (with verse 3) for voice or instrument
I am a child of God,
And blessings are in store;
If I learn to do his will,
I’ll live with him once more.
Oh, lead, guide, walk beside,
Help me to find the way.
Teach me what I must do
To live with him someday.

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For All Family Members* Watch the Mormon Message “Child of God”.  Discuss how you felt and what it means to be a Child of God.  Have everyone write down things that make them unique and of worth.

 

 

Object Lesson

Start by holding up a relatively crisp bill. Ask how much this bill is worth. Then crumble it up into a ball, stomp on it, punch it down, do whatever you want to make it yucky. Finally, unfold the bill and hold it up again. Ask how much it is worth now. Is there anyone who wouldn’t want it now that is has been tarnished? Point out that this is similar to our worth in Heavenly Father’s eyes. Nothing we do can detract from our worth to Him.

Set a goal as a family and as an individual of how to increase your sense of self worth. Customize to the needs of your family.

Goal Ideas:

For two weeks, every negative thought you have about yourself, replace it with at least two positive thoughts.

For two weeks, every negative thought you have about others, replace it with at least two positive thoughts.

If you struggle with your worth, make it a matter of prayer for a certain amount of time. Pray to know that God loves you and pray to understand your mission on this Earth.

For two weeks, notice the worthwhile qualities in others and acknowledge them verbally or in writing.

 

*For Younger Children* 

Read the following story with them:

 The Worth of Eddie Porter

(Based on an experience from the author’s family)

I wanted to save more tadpoles, so Dad and I went to the creek near General Vallejo’s old historic adobe place. There wasn’t much water left in the creek, just puddles with tadpoles in them. When the water dried up, they would die—unless we rescued them. Dad and I caught hundreds of those tadpoles in our jars and took them to the lake. Dad said that God wouldn’t waste time creating anything He didn’t love. The least we could do was respect His creations and help whenever, wherever, and whatever we could—tadpoles included!

One day while we were taking tadpoles out of the creek, Dad looked troubled. “What’s wrong?” I asked.

“I’m worried about Eddie Porter,” Dad replied. Dad was Brother Porter’s home teacher, and he and his companion could never get Brother Porter to let them into his home. “He doesn’t come to church,” Dad said. “He’s getting old, lives alone, and has a lot of problems. He seems depressed most of the time, and I think he believes that God has given up on him.”

Dad scooped out three tadpoles and dumped them into a pail of water. “He never says much when Brother Phillips and I talk to him at the door. Just nods and says he has things to do. But last month when we stopped by, he had moved. Where, I don’t know.” Dad looked up the creek bed as if he hoped he might spot Brother Porter coming out of the heat rising from the rocks like a thin, wavy wall. “I doubt he moved out of town, because he has lived here all his life,” Dad continued. “I’ve got to find him, Matt.”

“Why, Dad?” I was confused. “If Brother Porter wants to be alone, why worry about it?”

“He’s my responsibility, son,” Dad explained. “And I feel that he’s in real need. Brother Phillips is out of town for a couple of months, so I’ll try to find Brother Porter on my own.” Dad smiled at me. “Unless, of course, you’d like to help.”

“But what about these tadpoles, Dad? If we don’t get them moved, they’ll die. They want to be helped. Brother Porter doesn’t.”

“They have enough water to last a few more weeks. But I don’t know if Eddie Porter has the same amount of willpower,” Dad said. “Besides,” he added in a voice that made me look straight at him, “like you and me, Brother Porter is a child of God. The scriptures teach us that the Savior spent His entire life loving, lifting, and healing others. These little critters are important, but what is more important than all these tadpoles?”

“Brother Porter?” I guessed.

For the next two weeks, Dad and I were like detectives. We searched for clues, asked questions, and talked to people. But most of all we prayed that Heavenly Father would lead us to the right house.

Then one evening Dad and I walked up to a little old place, kind of jammed between two warehouses near the canal. Dad knocked on the rusty screen door, and we waited.

We were about to leave when the door opened. The old man standing behind the screen seemed like a ghost—kind of there and not there at the same time. He had whiskers and wore rumpled, worn-out clothes.

“Brother Porter,” Dad said.

The old man’s eyes looked sad and surprised, maybe even angry. “How did you find me?” he asked.

Dad smiled. “It wasn’t easy, Eddie. It’s taken us two weeks.”

Brother Porter looked at me. I guess I was nervous because my voice was shaky. “Hi, Brother Porter.”

Brother Porter looked back up at Dad. “Why?” he said. “Why did you want to find me? I’ve never—”

“Because you’re important, Brother Porter,” I said. “You’re a child of God. He loves you. And so do we. Yep, we do.” I said it again because he looked so surprised. It was quiet for a little bit, so I said, “Dad and I were saving tadpoles from the creek that’s drying up, but Dad wanted to start looking for you instead. You’re more important than all the tadpoles that ever hatched. Mom thinks so, too.” I held out a lunch bag. “She made some cookies for you.”

Brother Porter turned away from us. I thought he was still mad at us for bothering him, but when he turned back, he was crying. He pushed open the door. “Won’t you come in?” Dad didn’t say anything. He was crying, too.

We went inside, and Dad squeezed my hand. Suddenly I knew how important Eddie Porter—and everyone else—was. Jesus wouldn’t have spent His whole life helping others if it weren’t so.

The tadpoles could wait. They would be all right. Dad and I needed to make sure that Brother Porter would be all right first.

 

*For Teenagers or Adults* Read or watch the talk “You Matter to Him”,  by Dieter F. Uchtdorf.

 

Use this as an opportunity to express your love and appreciation to your children and how special each one is to you. Consider writing a letter to each one telling them of their unique spiritual gifts and qualities that you love about them and then give it to them at the end of the lesson.

Testify of the value that each child has in God’s eyes as well.

 

FHE Treat

Treat

Triple-Deckers and Pineapple Coconut Sherbet

Triple-Deckers

Ingredients:

1/2 cup butter, softened
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 cup peanut butter
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 4-ounce Mr. Goodbars, with peanuts
20 to 23 large marshmallows

 

Instructions:

1. Heat the oven to 375. Place the butter and sugar in a large bowl and blend with an electric mixer.

2. Add the peanut butter, egg, and vanilla extract, combining thoroughly. In a separate bowl, combine the salt, baking soda, and flour, then mix them into the wet ingredients.

3. Shape the dough into 1 1/4-inch balls and bake for 8 minutes on an ungreased cookie sheet. Meanwhile, your child can break the chocolate bars into small squares and use kitchen shears (with your supervision) to snip the marshmallows in half lengthwise.

4. Remove the cookies from the oven, top each one with a marshmallow half, and return the tray to the oven for an additional 3 to 4 minutes.

5. Finally, remove the cookies from the oven and place a piece of chocolate atop the marshmallows. Allow the cookies to remain on the baking sheet for 5 minutes before transferring them to cooling racks. Makes 3 1/2 to 4 dozen cookies.

Pineapple Coconut Sherbet

Ingredients:

1 quart cultured buttermilk
1 1/2 cups superfine sugar
1/3 cup canned cream of coconut
1 (20-ounce) can crushed pineapple, drained
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions:

1. Whisk together the buttermilk, sugar, and cream of coconut in a large mixing bowl until it is evenly blended. Stir in the pineapple and vanilla extract.

2. Cover the bowl with foil and place it in the freezer for 1 hour. Then remove the bowl and stir the mixture briefly, scraping the sides well. Return the sherbet to the freezer for another 45 minutes and then stir it again. Repeat this process once more, then let the mixture freeze overnight. When you’re ready to serve it, allow the sherbet to soften slightly, then process it briefly in a chilled blender to make it smooth and easy to scoop. Serve it at once in chilled dishes. Makes 6 to 8 servings

(Recipes taken from www.familyfun.go)

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

1-  H2-Ohhh!
Who says pool noodles are only for the pool? We turned one into a super squirter that can be used to launch all sorts of fun and games, such as the High Water Jump shown here.

Start by poking holes in a pool noodle with a large nail. Plug one end of the noodle with a wadded-up plastic shopping bag, then seal that end with duct tape. Insert a garden hose about 4 inches into the other end and secure it with duct tape if needed.

To play, swing the noodle and have your child jump over it, use it for a watery limbo contest, attach it with duct tape to a swing set so that kids can swing through the shower (as shown above), or let your kids come up with their own wet and wacky games.
2- Beach Bowling
The appeal of seaside bowling lies in its advantages bare feet allowed, the alley’s free, and there’s an unlimited supply of pins.

What You Need:

Plastic cup
Ball

Instructions:

1. Make 10 pins by filling a cup with moist sand (add water if the sand is too dry to hold a shape). Carefully turn the cup over and lift it off. Create the pins in a triangle with one pin in front, two pins in the next row, three in the next and four in the back row.

2. Draw a line in the sand about 6 or 8 feet from the pins. Take turns standing behind the line and rolling a softball or other small ball toward the pins to knock them over. Each player gets to roll the ball twice.

3. Count how many pins you knock over, set them up again and keep score in the sand.

 

Comments

comments

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About Aleah Ingram

Aleah Ingram
Aleah is a graduate of Southern Virginia University, where she studied English, Creative Writing, and Dance. She now works full time as a social media manager, writer, and editor. Aleah served a mission in California and is addicted to organic milk, Lang Leav poetry, Gaynor Minden pointe shoes, and Bollywood movies.

2 comments

  1. Avatar

    Thank you so much for posting these wonderful ideas! Each week the lesson corresponds to exactly what my family needs to hear, you are awesome!

  2. Avatar

    I’m teaching a relief society lesson about this on Thursday. I was planning on doing the exact $ demo you suggest here, but was having a hard time finishinf it up. Thank you so much!!!

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