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To be a good mother is an awe-inspiring task. When I recognize the power and influence of this elect calling, I am sobered: surely it is not a job to be taken lightly. There are many ways we can remember Mom and make her feel loved, here are a few ideas. Check out this great family home evening lesson on making mother matter! Scripture: Proverbs 31:10-31 Hymn: Love at Home or Mother, I Love You Lesson: Words a Mother Longs to Hear Treat: Oven Baked Churros or Chocolate Popcorn Activity: Mother’s Day Cards, Treat Mom View entire lesson...

Words a Mother Longs to Hear

FHE Scripture

Scripture

Proverbs 31:10-31

“10 Who can find a virtuous woman? for her price is far above rubies.
11 The heart of her husband doth safely trust in her, so that he shall have no need of spoil.
12 She will do him good and not evil all the days of her life.
13 She seeketh wool, and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands.
14 She is like the merchants’ ships; she bringeth her food from afar.
15 She riseth also while it is yet night, and giveth meat to her household, and a portion to her maidens.
16 She considereth a field, and buyeth it: with the fruit of her hands she planteth a vineyard.
17 She girdeth her loins with strength, and strengtheneth her arms.
18 She perceiveth that her merchandise is good: her candle goeth not out by night.
19 She layeth her hands to the spindle, and her hands hold the distaff.
20 She stretcheth out her hand to the poor; yea, she reacheth forth her hands to the needy.
21 She is not afraid of the snow for her household: for all her household are clothed with scarlet.
22 She maketh herself coverings of tapestry; her clothing is silk and purple.
23 Her husband is known in the gates, when he sitteth among the elders of the land.
24 She maketh fine linen, and selleth it; and delivereth girdles unto the merchant.
25 Strength and honour are her clothing; and she shall rejoice in time to come.
26 She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness.
27 She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness.
28 Her children arise up, and call her blessed; her husband also,and he praiseth her.
29 Many daughters have done virtuously, but thou excellest them all.
30 Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman thatfeareth the Lord, she shall be praised.
31 Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.”

 

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

Love at Home  Hymn #294 or Mother, I Love You -Children’s Songbook #207

Love at Home

1. There is beauty all around
When there’s love at home;
There is joy in ev’ry sound
When there’s love at home.
Peace and plenty here abide,
Smiling sweet on ev’ry side.
Time doth softly, sweetly glide
When there’s love at home.
Love at home, love at home;
Time doth softly, sweetly glide
When there’s love at home.

2. In the cottage there is joy
When there’s love at home;
Hate and envy ne’er annoy
When there’s love at home.
Roses bloom beneath our feet;
All the earth’s a garden sweet,
Making life a bliss complete
When there’s love at home.
Love at home, love at home;
Making life a bliss complete
When there’s love at home.

3. Kindly heaven smiles above
When there’s love at home;
All the world is filled with love
When there’s love at home.
Sweeter sings the brooklet by;
Brighter beams the azure sky.
Oh, there’s One who smiles on high
When there’s love at home.
Love at home, love at home;
Oh, there’s One who smiles on high
When there’s love at home.

 

Mother, I Love You

1. Mother*, I love you; mother, I do.
Father in Heaven has sent me to you.
When I am near you, I love to hear you
Singing so softly that you love me too.

2. Mother, I love you; mother, I do.
I want to help you because I love you.
I want to mind you; I want to find you
Happy and smiling because I love you.
Mother, I love you; I love you, I do.

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For Younger Children* 

Read or summarize “Making Mother’s Day Matter” byStacey C. Weeks (taken from the Ensign). Share the story and if you would like make your own mother’s day cards, or discuss other ways in which you can celebrate mom all year long. 

 Every Mother’s Day while I was growing up, I noticed my mother begin to weep the moment we entered the ward building. I always took comfort in her tears, believing they were shed out of love and gratitude for her rewarding position as my mother.

It was not until I became a mother of four children that I finally understood the cause of her tears. Mother’s Day was approaching, and I shared with her my unexpected feelings of depression and self-doubt. My mother then told me her own feelings of being overwhelmed at times by the magnitude of her responsibility as a mother. I decided then that I would find a way to overcome the negative feelings I was experiencing.

Later, as I knelt in prayer and asked for help, a new idea came to me that helped me avoid Mother’s Day tears.

First, I designed a homemade card for each one of the children. Next, I listed inside the cards each child’s unique qualities and strengths and also added an expression of my love. Then I informed my children that each card could be redeemed for a special day with Mother—a “Mother’s Day”—at some time in the future.

As I prepared these cards and listed the gifts of character for each child, my appreciation of my children grew and I could see clearly each one’s divine worth. My Mother’s Day cards and the resulting outings I had with the children have become some of the best Mother’s Day gifts I ever received.—Stacey C. Weeks, Carson City, Nevada

Share the story and if you would like make your own mother’s day cards, or discuss other ways in which you can celebrate mom all year long. 

 

*For All Family Members* 
Read or summarize “Words a Mother Longs to Hear” by Annette P. Bowen (taken from the Ensign). Share the story and if you would like make your own mother’s day cards, or discuss other ways in which you can celebrate mom all year long. 

Expressions of gratitude brighten the day of those we love.
LL79s

 

On Mother’s Day, my husband, then a Navy flight surgeon, had to spend the day at the hospital. As I hurried and scurried about the house getting our two boys, who were just four and two, ready for church, I somehow offended my oldest son. He scowled and muttered, “I hate mothers!” Undaunted, I scooted the boys out the door, and once they were safely belted in their seats, I told my son that he needed to think of three nice things to say about me; after all, it was Mother’s Day. He screwed up his face and thought about it for a mile or two, then announced, “Gosh, Mom, I can think of two things, but three is real hard!” I learned that day that my self-esteem could not be dependent on my children.

Obviously, there are many lessons to be learned as mothers. For most of us, it will take years of practice before our lives bear resemblance toProv. 31:28: “Her children arise up, and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her.” We know that being a mother is a job that has no end. True, too, are these words that my mother sent to me: “A mother is usually only as happy as her least happy child.” To be a good mother is an awe-inspiring task. When I recognize the power and influence of this elect calling, I am sobered: surely it is not a job to be taken lightly.

There are, however, simple words and phrases we can say to one another and to our mothers which, when used often, are guaranteed to lighten our loads and to bring light into many days.

“Thank you”

Could any of us tire of hearing these words? They need to be sprinkled generously throughout every day. When my eight-year-old says, “Thank you for the nice meal,” before clearing his plate from the table, I know I will happily continue to feed him until he is eighteen and beyond, no matter how many jars of peanut butter and gallons of milk he consumes.

Several months ago, after I finished teaching a Sunday School class of noisy teenagers, a woman stopped me outside the church and said, “My daughter really enjoys your class. Thank you for being her teacher.” That remark fueled my efforts through many a Sunday when I felt like turning in my chalk and eraser.

Last night, as my husband and I sat together on the couch for a quiet moment, he said, “This is a magic room. Thank you for making our home so comfortable and warm.” Needless to say, I’ll remember that comment for a long time when I’m straightening, cleaning, and adding a homey touch here and there. Mothers need to have their work recognized, and we hunger for appreciation.

“I love you”

We may know others love us, but we need to hear the words. Often. My parents often left little notes on our beds expressing their love and appreciation to us, and we have kept that family tradition alive in our home. How fun it is in the morning to find on my mirror a note left there by my early-rising husband. And last week, my youngest child came into my workroom and asked, “Hey, Mom, have you checked the kitchen counter yet?” I hadn’t, but I immediately arose to go see what I might find. There by the sink, in a kindergarten scrawl, accompanying a picture of a bear on a skateboard, were these words: “Mom, I love you.” Those words made my day. No mother can hear them enough.

Once, I jokingly told my husband and children that I expected to unwrap “about a hundred” gifts on Mother’s Day. Of course, I was exaggerating, but they took me at my word. They went shopping together, armed with a list of suggestions, and returned to spend hours giggling behind closed doors, cutting and wrapping. On that Mother’s Day I unwrapped nothing short of one hundred little gifts: individually wrapped pencils and pens; love and service coupons; several paper clips; rolls of breath mints; muffin and brownie mixes (their broad hint to me); and, several lovely gift items. We all had a wonderful time! Laughing, I told the family that I didn’t always need gifts, but I did need lots of hugs. They happily complied. The whole experience said, “I love you.”

“You’re okay”

I was struggling through a period of ill health. I had just had major surgery, and now I needed to return to the hospital. Concerned about how my children were affected by my temporary disability and my absence from the home, I had been prayerful about my needs and fears. The answer to that prayer came through my father, who called from three states away. After listening as I expressed my worries, and after being assured of my family’s love and prayers, my dad said these simple words: “Honey, you’re okay.” Down came the wall of worries with those words. Iwas okay. My family was surviving the experience. And, even more, I knew that I would continue to be okay in the future, through the impending repeat surgery and beyond. How often I have thought of my father’s sweet words when I’ve stumbled, felt discouraged, or alone. “Honey, you’re okay.” We all need to feel that kind of acceptance and approval.

One of the most refreshing experiences of this year was the night, while setting tables and cooking food for a Relief Society dinner, when five women and I

confessed how we really ran our homes. The truth came out: we often cooked in a hurry and didn’t fix elaborate meals; we told of our personal home-management foibles, disasters, and child-rearing woes; and (this was the real moment of truth) we confessed how often we changed the sheets on our beds. We laughed so heartily that a man walked over from the other side of the building and said, “I’m sorry to interrupt, but I really have to see what’s going on. I’m sure I’m missing something wonderful.” And he was. I went home from the church that night feeling reassured. I was not inadequate. I was not a failure. I felt blissfully normal.

Surely, as mothers, as children, as friends, as siblings, and as spouses, we can make any day a delight by saying the words that each of us hungers to hear.

Share the story and if you would like make your own mother’s day cards, or discuss other ways in which you can celebrate mom all year long. 

 

FHE Treat

Treat

Oven Baked Churros or Chocolate Popcorn

Oven Baked Churros


Ingredients

BakedChurros

  1. 1 (17.3-oz.) package frozen puff pastry sheets, thawed
  2. 1/4 cup sugar
  3. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  4. 1/4 cup melted butter

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 450°. Unfold and cut puff pastry sheets in half lengthwise, and cut each half crosswise into 1-inch-wide strips. Place strips on a lightly greased parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Bake 10 minutes or until golden brown.
  2. Meanwhile, combine sugar and cinnamon. Remove pastry strips from oven, and dip in butter; roll in cinnamon-sugar mixture. Let stand on a wire rack 5 minutes or until dry.

(Taken from My Recipes)

 

Chocolate Popcorn

Ingredients

ChocolatePopcorn

  1. 3 Tablespoons Unrefined Coconut Oil, Divided
  2. ¼ cups To 1/3 Cups Popcorn Kernels
    Note: 1/4 to 1/3 cup of popcorn kernels should yield about 8-10 Cups of popped. So if you are starting with popped, then you’ll need about 8-10 Cups!
  3. 1 cup Unsalted Peanuts
  4. 1-½ cup Chocolate Chips (milk, Semi-sweet Or Dark Chocolate)
  5. ⅓ cups Honey
  6. ⅓ cups Real Maple Syrup
  7. ¼ teaspoons Real Vanilla Extract
  8. Kosher Salt To Taste

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F and grease a large rimmed baking sheet.
  2. Heat one tablespoon of coconut oil in a large pot over medium-high/high heat. Once oil is hot, add a single popcorn kernel. Place lid on pot and wait for the kernel to pop. Once the kernel has popped, sprinkle in the remaining popcorn kernels to form a single layer on the bottom of the pan. Keep the pan on the burner but shake often as the kernels pop. Keep heating and shaking until the popping subsides and you no longer hear kernels rattling when you shake it. Be careful not to burn the popcorn!
  3. Place the popcorn onto the rimmed baking sheet and stir in the peanuts, set aside.
  4. In a heavy-bottom saucepan, add in the chocolate, honey, maple syrup and remaining coconut oil. Over medium heat, stir often until melted and smooth. Add in the vanilla, stir and then pour the mixture over the popcorn/peanut mixture. Toss well to coat.
  5. Place into your preheated oven and bake for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, toss to combine everything, and bake for an additional 10 minutes. Remove from oven and toss one last time before baking for a final 10 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool on pan. Stir to keep everything from sticking, season with kosher salt and serve slightly warm.
  6. Store in an airtight container for 1-2 weeks.Note: To keep this gluten free and dairy free, use dark chocolate and coconut oil.

(Taken from Tasty Kitchen)

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

 

1- Mother’s Day Cards (see Making Mother’s Day Matter)

2. Treat Mom with her favorite activity and treat!

 

Comments

comments

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About Aleah Ingram

Aleah Ingram
Aleah is a graduate of Southern Virginia University, where she studied English, Creative Writing, and Dance. She now works full time as a social media manager, writer, and editor. Aleah served a mission in California and is addicted to organic milk, Lang Leav poetry, Gaynor Minden pointe shoes, and Bollywood movies.
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