Think with me about President Gordon B. Hinckley, President Thomas S. Monson, and President James E. Faust taking the Scout Oath. Can you think of anything in the oath that they are not living daily? Do the other great men you know—your fathers, bishops, stake presidents, seminary teachers, and Scout leaders—live in harmony with the Scout Oath? They do .Check out this great family home evening lesson on Scouting! Scripture: D&C 4:2 Hymn: I’ll Go Where You Want Me to Go Lesson: The Merits of Scouting Treat: Citrus Fruit Salad or Red Velvet Cheesecake Dip Activity: Plan a camping trip! Or play a scouting game! View entire lesson...

On My Honor

FHE Scripture

Scripture

D&C 4:2

“2 Therefore, O ye that embark in the service of God, see that ye serve him with all your heart, might, mind and strength, that ye may stand blameless before God at the last day.”

FHE Lesson Hymn

Hymn

 

I’ll Go Where You Want Me to Go  Hymn #270

1. It may not be on the mountain height
Or over the stormy sea,
It may not be at the battle’s front
My Lord will have need of me.
But if, by a still, small voice he calls
To paths that I do not know,
I’ll answer, dear Lord, with my hand in thine:
I’ll go where you want me to go.

(Chorus)
I’ll go where you want me to go, dear Lord,
Over mountain or plain or sea;
I’ll say what you want me to say, dear Lord;
I’ll be what you want me to be.

2. Perhaps today there are loving words
Which Jesus would have me speak;
There may be now in the paths of sin
Some wand’rer whom I should seek.
O Savior, if thou wilt be my guide,
Tho dark and rugged the way,
My voice shall echo the message sweet:
I’ll say what you want me to say.

3. There’s surely somewhere a lowly place
In earth’s harvest fields so wide
Where I may labor through life’s short day
For Jesus, the Crucified.
So trusting my all to thy tender care,
And knowing thou lovest me,
I’ll do thy will with a heart sincere:
I’ll be what you want me to be.

 

FHE Lesson

Lesson

*For Young Children* 

Read and share “The Merits of Scouting” by Hikimai Johnson and discuss the ways in which scouting can prepare us for the future. Give your testimony and share how it has blessed your life.

While earning the merit badges for Scouts, I noticed that most of the badges involve some sort of service.

Scouting is a great learning process. Earning merit badges has helped me explore different professional opportunities in many different careers. It gave me a lot of experiences that help me now and will continue to help me in the future. Scouting has taught me basic survival skills in case of emergencies and it taught me the values of service to others. It helped me with my communication and leadership skills and it taught me how to set goals and accomplish them. It also taught me how to have fun camping with my family and friends!

Now I use the skills that I learned while earning the merit badges and my Eagle rank in my schooling, especially in the business area. I have listed Scouting and my Eagle rank when applying for academic honor societies, and I will be able to use it for other things. Scouting is a great tool to help me and other young men in schooling and in preparing for a mission, a career, and life in general. Through my experiences I have found that Scouting and the Duty to God program go hand in hand and both have helped me in the learning process of life.

As den chief for my mom I had the opportunity to help teach and work with other Scouts and Cub Scouts and I have also worked with my brother, who just received his Eagle, so I have had many opportunities to further the Scouting program. Scouting is awesome!

Discuss the ways in which scouting can prepare us for the future. Give your testimony and share how it has blessed your life.

 

*For All Family Members* 

Read and summarize “On My Honor” by Vaughn J. Featherstone and discuss the ways in which scouting can prepare us for the future. Give your testimony and share how it has blessed your life.

Living the Scout Oath will help you become the kind of man God can use in building His kingdom.

Several years ago at Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico, the participants were expressing gratitude to the ranch chairman, who happened to be me. They had asked my son, Scott, married with children, to say something. He came up on the stand, dressed in his Scout uniform, stood in front of me, raised his arm to the square in the Scout sign, and said:

“Dad, on my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; and to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight” (see Boy Scout Handbook, Boy Scouts of America [1998]). He said it with sincerity and as an oath, tears glistening, his voice filled with emotion. I knew he meant it with all his heart and soul.boy_scout_with_oath

The Scout Oath and Law

Before you take an oath, it’s important to know what it means. “On my honor” means that we will keep the oath—that our honor depends upon it. If we fail to keep the Scout Oath, we are violating a solemn promise. It continues, “… to do my duty to God.” This means, from a Church point of view, that we attend Church, pay tithing, accept callings, honor the priesthood, keep God’s commandments, and keep the standards of dress and conduct. Then the oath states, “… and my country.” Wherever we live in the world we should do our duty to our country by obeying the laws, sustaining good leaders, honoring the flag, and being good citizens.

An important part of the oath states, “… to obey the Scout Law.” The Scout Law is a wonderful model for life.

Be Trustworthy and Loyal

A Scout is trustworthy. Imagine if every Scout practiced this first principle of the Scout Law with all his heart. There are millions of Boy Scouts and leaders around the world. What a dramatic impact we could have on those around us if we all were trustworthy.

Each principle of the Scout Law is a sermon and demands action if we would live and practice the oath we take: a Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.

A Scout who takes the Scout Oath weekly should remember it is something he is committing his soul to. Imagine what a blessing it is to be loyal to Scouting, family, Church, country, and friends!

Be Friendly and Obedient

We take an oath to be friendly, kind, and courteous. At a national jamboree a 12-year-old Scout got separated from his patrol. He was standing alone in a sea of Scouts and about to break into tears. An older Scout saw him and went over and introduced himself. “I have a gift for you,” the older boy said. “It is a hand-carved bolo tie. A great Scouter, Bill Burch, carved it. He numbers each one. He has carved over 40,000.”

The older Scout presented the tie to the young scared Scout. About that time the patrol found the boy. They gathered around him, and for a few moments he was the center of attention with his new bolo tie. The tears had disappeared; he felt important. The older Scout had truly been friendly.

Not one of the 12 points mentioned in the Scout Law is selfish; the prophets of God in the Book of Mormon and other scriptures have taught each point. I believe the Scout Oath is an inspired oath for all young men.

For example, to be obedient is a great and wonderful blessing. It is a privilege to be obedient. It is not a “have to do” because of the standards; it is a “get to do.” We really are free when we are obedient to God’s commandments and to the Scout Law.

Be Cheerful and Thrifty

It is a blessing, as well, to be cheerful. I recall Elder Loren C. Dunn (1930–2001) of the Seventy several years ago suggesting in a talk “that a certain man looked like he had been weaned on lemon juice through a dill pickle.” Cheerfulness is contagious and is a strong positive influence for good. People enjoy being around others who are happy. In Proverbs we read, “A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance” (Prov. 15:13). Also it states, “A merry heart doeth good like a medicine” (Prov. 17:22).

If being cheerful is good for the soul, being thrifty is good for our financial well-being. Wastefulness and indulgence are not of God. They are negative influences and have serious consequences on us by and by. When we are thrifty we are self-reliant, able to be free to assist those in need. Scouting instructs us to be wise with our resources.

Be Brave, Clean, and Reverent

Profound knowledge and direction come from the Scout Law. A Scout is brave, clean, and reverent. Bravery is usually not sensational, although it may be. Bravery is manifest in many small acts, such as defending a young man against those who would mock or physically abuse him. It is standing up for an ideal and letting your voice be heard.

Bravery is a trait every young man can develop. It is based on love for others more than safety for self. One Venturer Scout who is blind signed up to go on a hike in southern California with his Scout troop. They hiked to Lord Baden Powell Peak over a steep trail. The young man held on to the shirt of a fellow Boy Scout every step of the way. It was a long hike and took two full days. This boy did not complain, did not seek pity, just kept grinding on and on until they came to the trail’s end. Equally as brave was the Scout who volunteered to lead his friend over a steep and challenging trail. He felt honored to help.

The traits of cleanliness and reverence complement each other. To beclean refers to body cleanliness, clean clothing, being well groomed and wearing appropriate attire.

To be reverent demands that we acknowledge God, that by our actions we express our devotion to Him. Reverence for the Lord has a profound impact on our conduct, our language, our personal prayers, and our standards. It is interesting that reverence is the 12th point in the Scout Law. It sums up all the others. Violating any of the other 11 points would be irreverent.

Help Others

We declare in the Scout Oath that we will “help other people at all times.” A 12-year-old Scout went to troop meeting at Mutual one Tuesday evening. When Mutual was over, he did not show up at home for about an hour and a half. His parents were concerned and were about to go look for him when he came through the door. “Where have you been?” the anxious father asked.

“One of the members of the bishopric was putting up the chairs all alone,” he replied. “You remember my patriarchal blessing states, ‘You were born to serve your fellow men.’ I stayed and helped him put away all the chairs. I sure love him.”

We do love those we serve. Imagine millions of men and boys helping other people at all times.

Be True to the Scout Oath

If we are true to the oath, we will also keep ourselves “physically strong.” We will eat wholesome foods, stay in good physical condition, and not abuse this wonderful body we have. Physical health brings happiness. It increases our capabilities in so many ways.

The Scout Oath includes being “mentally awake.” We must have good health to be mentally awake. Our eyes reflect whether we are awake or not. To be mentally awake we must see what is going on around us. We must be alert and aware.

The oath concludes with being “morally straight,” which means we do not deviate or compromise standards of chastity, virtue, or wholesomeness. We stand on higher ground and remain morally clean. A Scout who makes an oath that he will be morally straight is duty bound to live that way. The Scout Oath prepares us for the priesthood oath and covenant. Virtue is an essential part of our priesthood oath.

Think with me about President Gordon B. Hinckley, President Thomas S. Monson, and President James E. Faust taking the Scout Oath. Can you think of anything in the oath that they are not living daily? Do the other great men you know—your fathers, bishops, stake presidents, seminary teachers, and Scout leaders—live in harmony with the Scout Oath? They do.

Fellow Scouts, remember the sacredness of an oath. It is violated only to the detriment of your character. By living the Scout Oath and preparing for the oath and covenant of the Melchizedek Priesthood, you are truly preparing yourself to serve God, your fellow man, your family, and your community. Taking the Scout Oath is a sacred trust endorsed by the First Presidency. Living the Scout Oath will help you become the kind of man God can use in building His kingdom on earth.

Discuss the ways in which scouting can prepare us for the future. Give your testimony and share how it has blessed your life.

 

FHE Treat

Treat

Citrus Fruit Salad or Red Velvet Cheesecake Dip

Citrus Fruit Salad

IngredientsCitrus-Fruit-Salad-700x940

  1. 1 cantaloupe cut into bite size pieces
  2. 1 Pineapple cut into bite size pieces
  3. 1 pound of strawberry cut into pieces
  4. 1/4 cup of orange juice (I used pulp free)

Instructions:

  1. Dump all the fruit into a Large bowl. Pour the orange juice on top and mix well. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Mix again before serving.

(From SixSistersStuff)

 

 

Red Velvet Cheesecake Dip

IngredientsRVchee

  1. 8 oz cream cheese, at room temperature
  2. 1/2 cup butter, at room temperature
  3. 1 1/2 cups red velvet cake mix
  4. 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  5. 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  6. chocolate chips

Instructions:

  1. SMix together the cream cheese and butter until smooth and slightly fluffy.
  2. Next, add in the cake mix, brown sugar, and powdered sugar until completely combined.
  3. Fold in the bag of chocolate chips. I like it best served with vanilla wafers or graham crackers.

(From SixSistersStuff)

FHE Game / Activity

Activity

  1. Plan a camping trip!
  2. Have current or former scouts share their favorite stories.
  3. play one of your favorite scouting games

Comments

comments

About Aleah Ingram

Aleah Ingram
Aleah is a graduate of Southern Virginia University, where she studied English, Creative Writing, and Dance. She now works full time as a social media manager, writer, and editor. Aleah served a mission in California and is addicted to organic milk, Lang Leav poetry, Gaynor Minden pointe shoes, and Bollywood movies.

2 comments

  1. I love your idea but what other cake mix can be used if I don’t prefer to use Red Velvet cake mix?

    • FHE Lessons

      I know people have also tried chocolate cake mix, and they loved it, so you can feel free to try your favorite and experiment!

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